Job Interview Skills: Questions & Answers

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Hello there, my name is Rani, and I'm here to teach you today about job interview skills,

the dreaded job interview skills, the questions they maybe, hopefully, are going to ask you,

and more importantly, some really cool answers.

When people interview you, they're looking for specific answers, they're looking for

people who fit into categories, they're looking for people who meet their standards or qualifications.

The hard thing is we don't know what they want, so do your research.

See about the company, find out what the company does, how crazy.

Always make sure you know what the company does, what you're getting into.

If you're working in a restaurant, research about the restaurant.

Have qualifications that are important to work in a restaurant.

If you want a job in Canada, in Toronto at least, in a restaurant, you have to have a

certificate called SmartServe, and SmartServe is a government license, basically, that you

pay money to the government, of course, and they give you a certificate that qualifies

you to be a server.

It's basically if someone is really drunk, what to do.

So research what you need to get the job.

Make sure that you have the education or extra skills that you need so that they love your

answer.

So this is probably the first question that I am asked on job interviews.

They say, "Hello, Ronnie, how are you?"

"Fine, thank you, how are you?"

"So tell me about yourself."

Let's see, I like to drink beer, not a good answer.

I like sleeping late, not a good answer.

I love loud music, no, no.

So bad answers, good answers.

Always talk about your positive personality traits.

I am really friendly, I love people, I'm outgoing, I can speak to anyone, I'm good at solving

problems, the police haven't caught me yet, bad answer.

The next thing that you have to do in this question is you highlight your skills, what

you are good at, at your old job, or if you are really good at working with computers,

if you're good at art, something that somehow relates to the job.

If you want to work again in a restaurant, you tell them that you're really interested

in food and wine, and they go, "Oh, you're fine, good, food, wine, done, love food, love

wine."

If you're working in a computer, if you want a job at a computer company, talk about computers,

they love computers, they are your life.

Make sure that what you say relates somehow to the position you're going for.

If you go to a restaurant, don't tell them you like computers, doesn't matter, okay?

The next thing, basically, when they ask you this question, it's your time to shine.

You tell them how fantastic you are.

Go to great lengths to smile.

Always be positive.

Don't tell them, "I'm fantastic."

Tell them why you're fantastic.

Have you won awards?

Have people given you titles or said, "You've done a great job today, sir."

Next one, this question, I don't even know why people ask you, but they do, "Why should

we hire you?"

"No, I need a job.

I want to work at your lovely company and make lots of money."

Don't say that.

They love words like, "I am a team player."

I don't think they even know what that means.

Are you a volleyball player?

No.

When they hear words like team player, they think, "Oh, you work well with other people.

I can tell you what to do."

But they don't tell you that.

"So I'm a team player."

If it's a sales job, tell them you are assertive.

Tell them you get the job done.

You do it well.

You do it the best of anyone.

Also again, highlight your skills, your qualifications, your education.

If you are applying for a job at a radio station, and you studied radio in college, tell them

that.

It's already written in front of them on your resume.

Say it again.

You need something to say.

Also, your work history.

If you worked in a company that was similar to the company that you're applying for, tell

them about how great you were at that company, and how much you'd like to further your career

in the field.

I hope that these two questions, which are trick questions, help you to understand what

they want.

Alright, so another question that they might ask you, a trick question, is this one.

This is a doozy.

If they ask you this one, "Have you ever had a confrontation at your last job?"

If they ask you the first one, you can get off easily and say, "No, no, I haven't."

Lie.

Lying is fine, but if they ask you this one, which is more direct, "Tell me," because they

know you have, "about a confrontation at your last job."

"Well, I really hate this person, and they really made me angry, and I peed in their

coffee," is not a good answer.

Once again, embellishment or lying is fine.

You can highlight the positive and negative things about the confrontation.

Maybe you can say that an employee and you were working on a project, and you didn't

feel that the other person was giving a hundred percent, as you were.

You became frustrated or irritated with the co-worker, and you felt that he wasn't or

she wasn't doing a good job.

They will then ask you, "How did you resolve it?

How did you resolve the situation?"

Always say things like, "Well, in the end, it was fine.

We talked about it.

We communicated."

You can also say, "I spoke to my boss about it, and we had a meeting, and everything was

fine."

Always make sure that the end of the confrontation is worked out, even if it wasn't.

Always make sure that whatever happens, there was nothing bad in the end.

Lying, there's a fine line between lying and getting the job.

Another one that's very, very difficult and tricky is this one.

They will ask you, "Well, all right, if you've gotten this far, what are your positive and

negative traits?"

Always talk about your positive traits.

Five of these, one negative trait is perfect.

Never tell them all of the negative things about you.

Always focus on the positive.

Tell them that you really enjoy being around other people.

You love working eight hours a day without a break.

Sarcasm doesn't work in a job interview.

You're a hard worker.

You're a dedicated worker.

Negative traits, this is difficult.

They want you to tell them something bad about you.

They're dying.

They're like, "Ha, ha, ha.

Tell us something evil.

Tell us something bad."

Tell them something bad about you.

Make it little.

Say something that you are obsessed with research.

You go home at night, and you like to research about the other company.

You love knowledge.

It keeps you awake at night, but make sure that what you tell them is only a little bit

negative.

Do not tell them every bad thing about you.

All of a sudden, you're here, and your job goes down, and they say, "Okay, thank you.

See you later.

We'll call you."

Not a good ending to a job interview because they're not going to call you.

So always remember, when they throw this question at you, many positive traits, one negative

trait.

Not a bad negative trait.

Tell them that you don't wash behind your ears every day.

Job interview skills, questions, and the all-important answers.

I hope you get that job you're looking for.

If you have any questions, please go to www.engvid.com, the website, and ask me there.

Good-bye.